ANZAC Slice | Super Easy Recipe (2024)

Published: · Modified: by Lucy · This post may contain affiliate links · 60 Comments

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Ourclassic ANZAC Slice takes just 10 minutes to prepare and is perfect for lunchbox snacks! Chewy, sweet and oh-so-delicious (just like yourfavourite ANZAC biscuits!).

ANZAC Slice | Super Easy Recipe (1)

*Please note that my ANZAC Slice recipe has been approved for publishing by the Australian Department of Veterans Affairs.

ANZAC biscuits are an absolute classic recipe in Australia. ANZAC stands for “Australian and New Zealand Army Corps” and ANZAC biscuits are traditionally made to commemorate ANZAC Day on the 25th April each year.

Our ANZAC Slice recipe is based on our old fashioned ANZAC biscuit recipe... but the mixture is baked into a slice rather than rolled into biscuits (a super great time-saver!).

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What You Need To Make ANZAC Slice

This is such a budget-friendly recipe that's made from pantry and fridge staples. Here's what you need (hopefully you might already have these ingredients at home!):

*Scroll to the recipe card at the bottom for ingredient quantities and the method

  • rolled oats - alternatively you can substitute the rolled oats with quick oats if you prefer
  • plain flour
  • brown sugar - either light or dark brown sugar are both fine to use
  • desiccated coconut - a dried fine coconut that can be bought in packets from the supermarket
  • butter - you can use salted or unsalted butter for this recipe
  • golden syrup - if you can't access golden syrup, you can replace it with honey, rice malt syrup or maple syrup
  • water
  • bicarbonate of soda - also known as baking soda

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How To Make ANZAC Slice - A 10 Minute Melt & Mix Recipe

If you've got 10 minutes and a stove-top, microwave or Thermomix, then you can prep our ANZAC Slice recipe without any fuss.

*Scroll to the recipe card at the bottom for ingredient quantities and the method

Step 1 - Place the oats, brown sugar, flour and coconut into a bowl

Mix together and set aside until needed

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Step 2 - Melt the butter, golden syrup and water and then stir through the bi-carbonate of soda

You can use a microwave, stove-top or Thermomix for this step (refer to the recipe card below)

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Step 3 - Pour the liquid over the dry mixture and stir to combine

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Step 4 - Press firmly into a lined baking tin and bake until lightly golden

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How To Store ANZAC Slice

ANZAC Slice can be stored in an airtight container for several weeks. Please note that it will turn softer after a few days.

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FAQ

Can I make your ANZAC Slice recipe using my Thermomix?

Absolutely! I've included both the conventional and Thermomix methods in the recipe card below.

Can ANZAC Slice be frozen?

Yes! It can be frozen in an airtight container for up to 3 months.

How can ANZAC Slice last so long at room temperature?

ANZAC Slice is made using exactly the same ingredients as ANZAC biscuits - which were originally made by the wives and mothers of soldiers fighting in World War 1 and were sent to them in packages. They used this recipe as the biscuits wouldlast for several weeks.

Can I add chocolate to this recipe?

You sure can! Check out our Chocolate Chip ANZAC Slice recipe here for details.

How will I know when my slice is cooked?

This slice takes approximately 25 minutes to cook - however, all ovens are so different. So start checking from 15 minutes - your slice will be ready when it's lightly golden.

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More Lunch Box Recipes

If you've got hungry little mouths to feed, then please browse our collection of over 115 lunch box recipes! From sweet muffins, slices, cookies, bliss balls and cakes to savoury scrolls, quiches, sausage rolls and more! Plus there's a free lunch box snacks printable to download too!

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ANZAC Slice

Ourclassic ANZAC Slice takes just 10 minutes to prepare and is perfect for lunchbox snacks! Chewy, sweet and oh-so-delicious (just like yourfavourite ANZAC biscuits!).

5 from 35 votes

Print Pin Rate

Course: Slices

Cuisine: lunch box snacks

Prep Time: 10 minutes minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes minutes

Servings: 16 serves

Calories: 277kcal

Author: Lucy - Bake Play Smile

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (90g) rolled oats
  • 1 cup (125g) plain flour
  • cup (135g) brown sugar
  • cup (65g) desiccated coconut
  • 125 g butter chopped
  • 2 tbs golden syrup
  • 2 tbs water
  • ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda

Instructions

Conventional Method

  • Preheat oven to 170 degrees celsius (160 degrees cesius fan-forced).

  • Grease and line a standard sized slice tray (approximately 17X28cm) with baking paper.

  • Combine the rolled oats, flour, sugar and coconut in a bowl. Set aside.

  • Place butter, syrup and the water into a microwave-safe bowl and heat for 2 minutes on 70% power (or until the butter has melted). Alternatively you can melt the ingredients in a saucepan on the stove-top (or use the Thermomix method below).

  • Stir through the bicarbonate of soda.

  • Pour the butter mixture over the oat mixture and mix through.

  • Place the mixture into the tray and press down firmly.

  • Bake for approximately 25 minutes or until lightly golden brown.

  • Leave in the baking tray to cool for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

  • When the slice has cooled completely, cut it into slices.

Thermomix Method

  • Preheat oven to 170 degrees celsius (160 if using fan forced). Grease and line a standard sized slice tray (approximately 17X28cm) with baking paper.

  • Place the butter, golden syrup, water and brown sugar into the TM bowl. Melt for 3 minutes, 100 degrees, Speed 1.

  • Add the bicarbonate of soda to the melted butter mixture and combine for 10 seconds, Speed 3.

  • Add the rolled oats, plain flour and coconut. Mix together for 40 seconds on Reverse, Speed 2.

  • Place the mixture into the tray and press down firmly. Bake for approximately 25 minutes or until lightly golden brown.

  • Leave in the baking tray to cool for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

  • When the slice has cooled completely, cut it into slices.

Notes

RECIPE NOTES & TIPS

*Please note that my ANZAC Slice recipe has been approved for publishing by the Australian Department of Veterans Affairs.

  • rolled oats – alternatively you can substitute the rolled oats with quick oats if you prefer
  • brown sugar – either light or dark brown sugar are both fine to use
  • desiccated coconut – a dried fine coconut that can be bought in packets from the supermarket
  • butter – you can use salted or unsalted butter for this recipe
  • golden syrup – if you can’t access golden syrup, you can replace it with honey, rice malt syrup or maple syrup
  • bicarbonate of soda – also known as baking soda

Chocolate chip version -If you want to add chocolate to this recipe, check out our Chocolate Chip ANZAC Slice recipe here.

Microwave, stove-top or Thermomix -you can use either a microwave, stove-top or Thermomix to melt the ingredients for our ANZAC slice.

Cooking time - This slice takes approximately 25 minutes to cook – however, all ovens are so different. So start checking from 15 minutes – your slice will be ready when it’s lightly golden.

Storing the slice - ANZAC Slice can be stored in an airtight container for several weeks. Please note that it will turn softer after a few days.

Freezing the slice -This slicecan be frozen in an airtight container for up to 3 months.

Nutrition

Calories: 277kcal | Carbohydrates: 35g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 10g | Cholesterol: 17mg | Sodium: 103mg | Potassium: 136mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 195IU | Vitamin C: 0.2mg | Calcium: 23mg | Iron: 1.7mg

Did you try this recipe?Mention @BakePlaySmileBlog or tag #BakePlaySmile!

ANZAC Slice | Super Easy Recipe (2024)

FAQs

What can I substitute for golden syrup in Anzac biscuits? ›

Best substitute for golden syrup is a combination of light molasses or treacle, plus honey. I use 1 part molasses or treacle, and 3 parts honey – the flavour is nearly identical, and the colour is very similar (a bit darker).

Are Anzac biscuits crunchy or chewy? ›

According to taste.com.au Food Editor Miranda Payne, the traditional Anzac biscuit was the harder, crunchy version. Over time, the original recipe was modified with variations being cooked for less time (making them chewier) or adding more sugar (so they're super crispy).

Why are my Anzac biscuits not flat? ›

If your Anzacs spread, your butter was too warm. Chill them for at least 30 minutes before baking, and this should help.

What can I use instead of coconut in Anzac biscuits? ›

My partner wants to make Anzac biscuits for a friend of ours who is deathly allergic to all nuts, including coconut. What would be a good substitute for it? The best thing we can think of is flax meal or ground oats with some added coconut-free coconut flavouring.

What is the American equivalent of golden syrup? ›

In the U.S., golden syrup is usually sold under the name of light treacle, but it's not readily available in many grocery stores. In cooking recipes, molasses and light treacle are often used interchangeably because their textures and flavor profiles are similar.

Why do Australians eat Anzac biscuits? ›

We make ANZAC biscuits on ANZAC Day. We're not Americans. We make them because they were made during the First World War either (depending on which sources you believe) as a biscuit which was sent to the troops overseas or as a means of raising funds for the war effort here in Australia.

What is the difference between Anzac biscuits and Aussie bites? ›

One Anzac biscuit contains 187 calories, 8 grams of fat, 28 grams of carbs, and 11.4 grams of sugar. By comparison, an Aussie Bite is fairly similar, except it has 130 calories, 7 grams of fat, 14 grams of carbs, and a little more than half the amount of sugar as an Anzac biscuit.

What were Anzac biscuits originally called? ›

At first the biscuits were called Soldiers' Biscuits, but after the landing on Gallipoli, they were renamed ANZAC Biscuits.

Why bicarb soda in Anzac biscuits? ›

Baking soda or bicarb soda is the main raising agent in Anzac biscuits - it is added to the wet ingredients before being mixed into the dry ingredients.

What if Anzac biscuit mix is too dry? ›

Don't let the mixture stand around.

So, make sure you roll and bake the mixture as soon as possible after mixing to make rolling and flattening of the biscuits easy. If it does get a little dry you can just mix in another tablespoon or two of water to help make it a little more pliable before shaping.

Why is my Anzac biscuit mixture dry? ›

Texture - The biscuit dough has to be just right. If while mixing, you feel that the dough is too dry and crumbly and you are not able to shape it into rounds, add more liquid (this can be either in the form of a tablespoon of melted butter or just a tablespoon of boiling water).

Can dogs eat Anzac biscuits? ›

During World War I, ANZAC biscuits were a popular treat made by wives and mothers for their loved ones fighting in the war. The ingredients used in the original recipe are generally safe for dogs, but we have made a few adjustments to eliminate the use of unnecessary ingredients like sugar and butter.

When was the addition of coconut added to Anzac biscuits? ›

The earliest Anzac Biscuit / Crispies recipe I have seen to include coconut was in a 1927 recipe, but it seems to be 1929 when it really took off as a key ingredient (although not enough to completely knock the original recipe off its popularity perch).

How do you make golden syrup? ›

Place 110g (1/2 cup) of sugar in a medium saucepan and add 125ml (1/2 cup) water. Cook, stirring, over low heat for 3 minutes or until sugar dissolves. Increase heat to medium and bring to a simmer. Simmer, without stirring, for 8-9 minutes or until mixture is golden.

Can you substitute honey for golden syrup in Anzac biscuits? ›

Anzac biscuits also traditionally use golden syrup, but it seems as if it is a little harder to find here than it is in Australia and New Zealand. So, I switched it out and used Honey instead. If you would like to use Golden Syrup then by all means go ahead - it is a 1:1 swap.

Can I use honey instead of golden syrup in biscuits? ›

Honey: Similar in color, taste, and texture to golden syrup, honey is a good substitute for treacle. Look for a thick amber honey, rather than a super-light honey. Use the same amount of honey as you would golden syrup in a recipe.

Can I use maple syrup instead of golden syrup? ›

Yes, maple syrup can be used instead of golden syrup in many recipes, however this will result in a slightly different flavour. Golden syrup and maple syrup are generally substituted in a 1:1 ratio, however you may choose to use slightly less maple syrup to maintain texture and consistency.

What sugar is equivalent to golden syrup? ›

Golden syrup can be a delightful alternative to sugar in cakes. Its high fructose content allows you to use a quarter less golden syrup than the sugar required in the recipe, but you will still achieve the same level of sweetness – allowing you to enjoy a deliciously sweet cake.

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